Content Strategy, Lean Agile Development

 

PRIORITIZING THE MESSAGE

A travel start up had been partnering with a visual design agency to design the look and feel of their site but they did not have a firm structure for the content for the site. With such stunning visuals and engrossing storytelling it was critical to design an information architecture that allowed the types of content to maintain their unique voice while also being flat enough to maximize findability.

Problem #1: How might we structure editorial content to allow the user to easily navigate through the experience and still preserve the creative vision?

Solution: Use persistent navigation and contextual cues to maintain a flatter information architecture.

Process: Conducting informal card sorts and in-person white board sessions with the client allowed me to provide recommendations based on the priority they assigned to content types in a way that satisfied their business needs as well as supported their editorial vision. Once the high-level structure was agreed upon, I created a site map that I used to focus our continuing conversations.

 
Maintaining a wider, more shallow information architecture allows the user to contextually navigate through the experience

Maintaining a wider, more shallow information architecture allows the user to contextually navigate through the experience

 
 

In order to do this I created a series of low-fidelity annotated wire frames that proposed consolidating the 4 new pages and 4 sub-pages into two top-level pages with CTAs that opened a modal window for data capture. This proposal allowed for contextual functionality based on the user’s location within the site’s content that would drive users to either sign up for more information or drive them to the product subscription flow.

 
 
Creating visuals to guide the conversation allowed me to sell-in our approach to the SLT

Creating visuals to guide the conversation allowed me to sell-in our approach to the SLT

Using annotated wireframes to build consensus on key functional decisions sped development time.

Using annotated wireframes to build consensus on key functional decisions sped development time.

 
 

After discussing internally the client agreed to this approach and thanked us for understanding the goals of their pivot while maintaining the voice of the brand through an emphasis on their editorial content.